All posts in Assessing Problems in Your Horse

Slippery

Sandra moved to Maine four years ago with her two horses. On my first visit to her farm she told me that her older gelding, Benny, had a history of belly aches. I asked what he was getting to eat. She said he gets about ¾ of a bale of…

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The Squirts

It happened again today. It was one of those “while you’re here” conversations we all have with our health providers. In this case it was Andrea asking about her aged warm blood gelding, Whiz. “The other thing, if you have time. It’s not a big deal, but it’s annoying to…

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That Bottle of Pills

Two weeks ago I got a phone call from Lucy whose gelding was at a full gallop when he slipped, fell on rough ground, and slid for a few feet on his right side. After he got up, he favored his right hind leg for a minute and then seemed…

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The Sound of Hoofbeats

It’s a saying all veterinarians know: “When you hear the sound of hoof beats, don’t look for zebras.” In other words, unless you happen to be on the plains of Africa, if you hear hoof beats, they are most likely coming from horses and not zebras. Consider the ordinary before…

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Looking and Seeing

Last week I was on my way to an evening church activity with a friend. The roads were icy, and he drove slowly. We noticed a police cruiser facing us at an intersection a few hundred yards from the church. We turned left, and then as we started into the…

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Bent Frames – Part II

In a recent article I warned against buying a used car with a bent frame. A vehicle with a bent frame will never really be right on the road. I described one type of “bent frame” in a horse. That was the condition known as heaves. Another horse to avoid…

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Bent Frames

We didn’t have a car in my family until I was 12 years old. It was a big green Buick with plenty of miles on it. She was the first of several used cars. Every few years the current one would start to fail, and my father would go out…

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ADR

ADR. It’s a term used by veterinarians to describe a horse that isn’t really sick, but isn’t really well, either. The initials stand for “Ain’t Doin’ Right”. We use ADR to describe the horse that might be off his feed a bit, or seems a little depressed. It’s that horse…

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Learn from the Pupil

It’s always scary. You walk into the barn and right away sense that something is wrong. The horse that is usually at his door is way back in the stall. As soon as you enter the stall he comes over, seeking comfort and relief. Even in the dim light you…

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